Uvex Skyper Blue Blocker Glasses Product Review

by Health

A couple of months ago, I bought the Uvex S1933X Skyper Safety Glasses to watch television. WHAT???? For those of you that have ever had sleep issues or are currently counting sheep at night, you may want to read on.

I spent about three years with a horrible case of middle insomnia. I could fall asleep easily but would wake up in the middle of the night and twiddle my thumbs for hours. I tried all the sleep hygiene hacks – black-out blinds, not using my computer for at least an hour before bed, snack with protein for blood sugar stabilization, getting out of bed if I was awake for more than 20 minutes, lavender oil. I could go on.

A few months ago I was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s disease, nervous system fatigue, and leaky gut (whomp whomp) and learned that none of those sleep hygiene methods would work based on my issues. Now that I have two of the three almost managed and the third under control, I still want to have great sleep because I’ve been sleeping like a champ for the last month.

Computers and screens emit blue rays, which can interfere with melatonin. Melatonin is the sleep hormone and is produced by the pineal gland. It likes darkness, so using that computer or screen before bed shuts down your melatonin production. Know what else melatonin suppressing does? It works on the synthesis, secretion, and action of insulin. The reduction in melatonin production that may occur with normal aging, shift-work, or artificial light at night, induces insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, sleep disturbance, and metabolic circadian disorganization and can lead to obesity. (Journal of Pineal Research). Diabetics take note!

Why? The evil blue rays.

Solution? Blue-ray blocking glasses. Any blue-blocking glasses will do, but when I decided to first test them, I chose a cheap pair, the Uvex Skyper, whopping $7.95 on Amazon and loved them. I only watch TV when my husband is home, which is about 8 or 9pm at night and we might watch one show. I put these babies on and say, “go little melatonin…start your thang”.

They are huge on my face but are super lightweight and cheap enough that if I traveled and broke them, it wouldn’t be the end of the world. I also wear them if I’m working late, so I don’t get any blue rays from my computer.

Assignment: Throw on some blue-blocking glasses if you’re looking at a computer or TV screen at night and see if it affects your sleep. Tell your friends and family that melatonin suppressing is for posers and sleep is for beauty, health, productivity, and kicking ass in the morning. G’night!

Update: I now use these blue-ray blocking glasses (affiliate link below), which don't make me look like I'm ready to start a garage project or a science experiment – Gunnar Gaming and Computer Glasses.

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jim west

Principal and Managing Director, GFF Architects