Discriminate to concentrate

by Productivity

Do you ever find yourself focusing intently on a task that isn’t revenue-producing but makes you feel good because you’re able to check a box when finished?
Do you think because you’ve checked off all those boxes at the end of the day that you’re productive and efficient?

While reading the book E-Myth Mastery, I came across an idea that directly fits with my philosophy. Being focused and able to concentrate on a task only works if you are able to discriminate. It doesn't do any good to be focused if you are spending that time on irrelevant or ‘outside your line of genius' tasks.

Discriminate first. Then get focused.

Discriminate to concentrate.

This is so important to understand when prioritizing your daily tasks. If you spend half your day on $10.00 an hour tasks, rather than the $100.00 an hour tasks that you should be, it doesn’t do a bit of good to check those boxes.

ABCDE

ABC are your Top Three Tasks
D – Delegate those tasks that you can. If you have direct reports or an assistant, give them the skills, knowledge and tools to take over that task and then trust them with it.
E – Eliminate. Skim through your tasks every day and determine if there is anything you can eliminate. ‘Nice to haves’ mean nothing and typically aren’t value-added. If your client wouldn’t pay you your hourly wage for the two hours you spend formatting that spreadsheet perfectly, stop doing it. If creating a report that no one asked for, but that you think might be helpful, and you spent 30 minutes on, eliminate it.

We shouldn’t discriminate against hairless cats, planned communities or Brussels Sprouts, but we should discriminate against our D and E tasks.

What are two tasks on your list that you can D and E?

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jim west

Principal and Managing Director, GFF Architects